New York State Literary Technical Assistance Program

CATEGORY: Programming

In this Tip Sheet, Robert Baron summarizes his discussion with Kathleen Masterson, NYSCA Literature Program Director, on the New York Folk Arts Roundtable and how the literary field can benefit from their example use of self and peer assessment, from Facing Pages: A Statewide Literary Convening, June 3, 2005. Robert Baron has served as the Folk Arts Program Director at NYSCA since its establishment in 1985. He was also Folklore Administrator of the National Endowment for the Humanities while on leave from NYSCA (2000-20001); the Director of NYSCA's Museum Program (1996-2000) and a museum educator at The Brooklyn Museum from 1977-79. Baron is a Non-Resident Fellow in the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University. He served as President of the Middle Atlantic Folklife Association. In 2002, Baron received the Benjamin A. Botkin Award for Outstanding Achievment in Public Folklore from the American Folklore Society, and in 2005 he was a Fulbright Senior Specialist in Finland. His publications include Public Folklore, ed. with Nicholas R. Spitzer (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1992).

Contact

Links

A Model Roundtable

This Tip Sheet is derived from the September, 2004, joint CLMP/LitTAP Coffee Break on how to promote cooperation between literary presenters and publishers.

Contact

Links

http://www.littap.org/resources/4.4.3.CollaborationTipSheet.pdf

This guide was designed to show you how to present a reading or workshop, and to help you bring into reality the kind of literary event you’d like to have. We also want to give the new sponsor encouragement, an idea of what to expect, and information about the Poets & Writers’ Readings/Workshops Program, which provides funding up to $1,000 per year per organization to supplement writers’ fees for readings and workshops. Although current funding restricts grants to events that take place in New York State, California, Chicago, or Detroit, writers from any state may participate.

Contact

Links

http://www.littap.org/resources/4.4.2.GuidetoPresenting.pdf

Payment to writers is a key component of sound and successful literary presenting. However, deciding on a payment policy for your organization can be complicated by the fact that there are no set amounts or formalized contract structures for writers’ fees, which vary widely.

Contact

Links

http://www.littap.org/resources/4.4.1.2.GuidelinesOnWritersFees.pdf
http://www.littap.org/resources/4.4.1.2.GuidelinesOnWritersFees.doc

In this Tip Sheet, Maria Mazzioti Gillan summarizes her contribution to the panel discussion Building Audiences for Literature, from Facing Pages: A Statewide Literary Convening, June 3, 2005. Maria Mazzioti Gillan is the Founder and Executive Director of the Poetry Center at Passaic County Community College in Paterson, New Jersey. She is also a Professor and the Director of the Creative Writing Program at SUNY/Binghampton and the editor of the award-winning Paterson Literary Review. Her eight books of poetry include: Where I Come From (1995), Things My Mother Told Me (Guernica Editions, 1998), and Italian Women in Black Dresses (Guernica, 2002). She has won the Angelie Lauri, John Fante, May Sarton, and Fearin Houghton awards, as well as the New Jersey State Council on the Arts Fellowships in Poetry, and the American Literary Translator?s Award through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Contact

Links

http://www.littap.org/resources/MariaGillan.pdf

The former director of The Writer’s Center of Bethesda, Maryland, describes how he created successful internet-based writing workshops, and how you can too.

Contact

Links

http://www.littap.org/resources/4.4.3.BookendWorkshops.pdf

Risk taking and boundary breaking are both essential to the creative process. Therefore, it’s safe to say that all live performance involves some risk on the part of the presenter. This checklist offers indicators that will help you in planning.

Contact

Links

http://www.littap.org/resources/4.4.1.LivePerformanceRisk.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Kristin Prevallet is the author of Perturbation, My Sister (a study of Max Ernst’s Hundred Headless Woman) which was published by First Intensity Press. Her most recent chapbook is Selections from The Parasite Poems, published by Barque Press. Some of The Parasite Poems can be seen in the Poets & Poems section of the Poetry Project web site. She has edited a selection of ballads and collages by the poet Helen Adam. She is the co-editor, with Tonya Foster, of Third Mind: Creative Writing through Visual Art, from Teachers & Writers Collaborative Press.

Contact

Links

http://www.littap.org/resources/WOTKristenPrevalet.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Nicole Hefner has had her poems published in The New York Quarterly, Lingo, Washington Square Review, The Windmill, The Young Zionist Newsletter, and EarthQuakes. Ms. Hefner was awarded the Washington Square Poetry Prize in 1998. Jean Valentine was the judge. A graduate from the University of Oklahoma, where she studied under legendary poet George Economou, Nicole went on to study under Sharon Olds, Marie Howe, and Jean Valentine in the MFA program at New York University. She now lives in Brooklyn with her fish and two men. Nicole likes to horseback ride, kayak, and rapel down sheer cliffs without safety ropes.

Contact

Links

http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.7.WOTNicoleHefner.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Aaron Belz is a poet, non-fiction writer, and critic who has published in magazines ranging from Gulf Coast to Wired. He also writes extensively on digital media and was a founding partner of Schwa.com. He has spent this spring teaching at Jackson Elementary School in the city of St. Louis, where he lives with his wife and two kids. Aaron has an MA in Creative Writing from NYU (1993). Today we did the lesson that my third-grade kids had been talking about from the time they first perused their books: “Braggin’ Rites.” Next week is my last week with them, so I had to choose one of the remaining lessons, and this was the one that cried out to be tried.

Contact

Links

http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.6.WOTAaronBelz.pdf

In this Tip Sheet, Samantha Schnee summarizes the session she led from Technically Speaking: Breakout Topics for Publishers and Presenters, held at Facing Pages: A Statewide Literary Convening, June 2 and 4, 2005. Samantha Schnee has been the editor of Words Without Borders since its launch in 2003. She is the former editor of Zoetrope: All-Story, a literary journal founded by Francis Ford Coppola that won the 2001 National Magazine Award for fiction. In 2001 she was the U.S. recipient of the Frankfurt Bookfair Fellowship, which assembles editors from sixteen countries to build international relationships in publishing.

Contact

Links

http://www.littap.org/resources/SamanthaSchnee.pdf

In this Tip Sheet, Eric Gansworth summarizes his contribution to the panel discussion Building Audiences for Literature, from Facing Pages: A Statewide Literary Convening, June 3, 2005. Eric Gansworth, Professor of English and Lowery Writer in Residence at Canisius College, in Buffalo, NY, is an enrolled member of the Onondaga Nation who grew up on the Tuscarora Reservation in Western New York. He is the author of three novels, Indian Summers, Smoke Dancing and Mending Skins, and a collection of poems, Nickel Eclipse: Iroquois Moon; his work has been widely published in journals and anthologies.

Links

The Reading as Invitation/Rock Concert or Designing an Effective Set List (revised 2015)

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Corie Herman earned her M.F.A. from New York University and is a T&W writer-in-residence. A finalist for the 2002 Randall Jarrell Poetry Prize, her poetry has appeared in Kalliope, Caylx, and Phoebe. Her first collection of poems, Radishes Into Roses, was published by Linear Arts Press. “I have found, as a teaching-artist serving District 75 schools in New York City, that introducing short poetic forms to students with special needs has many benefits. For many emerging readers and writers and students with autism, poetic structure offers definable freedom, obtainable goals, and the opportunity to use other learning strengths, such as math. The quintet, popularly known as the cinquain, is an American poetry form developed by Adelaide Crapsey (1878-1914). The form was influenced by the Japanese tanka and haiku, and consists of five lines with twenty-two syllables (distributed as 2, 4, 6, 8, 2). Here is a typical class that integrates interpersonal skills, reading, writing, vocabulary, musicality, and movement.”

Contact

Links

http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.1.WOTCorieHerman.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Tina Cane was born in Hell’s Kitchen and raised in NYC’s East and West Village. She attended the University of Vermont and the Sorbonne. She did her graduate work at the University of Paris X-Nanterre where she earned a Master’s in French literature. She has taught French, English and Creative Writing at Friends Seminary School in Manhattan and is presently on leave to write. Her poems have appeared in New Press Literary Quarterly, Salt Hill Journal, GIRLS: An Anthology (Global City Press, 1997) and Hanging Loose (#69, 70,and 75).

Contact

Links

http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.7.WOTTinaCane.pdf

On the conception and growth of citywide reading programs Bookselling This Week said: “It’s doubtful that either Nancy Pearl, executive director of the Washington Center for the Book at the Seattle Public Library (WCB), or Chris Higashi, associate director for WCB, realized just how influential an idea they had conceived when they launched ‘If All of Seattle Reads the Same Book’ in 1996. Today, over 50 cities, counties, or states have begun programs that encourage communities to read the same book at the same time and then to discuss it in numerous venues.” (Read more of the article at http://news.bookweb.org/news/306.html) This essay comes from Writers & Books, on their “If All of Rochester Read the Same Book…” initiative, which connects people to the experience of literature and to others throughout their community, through reading and discussion. For four months beginning in January 2004, the entire Rochester community will be turned into one giant book club, as Writers & Books once again presents “If All of Rochester Read the Same Book…” For more information about Writers & Books’ “If All of Rochester Read the Same Book…” please visit http://www.wab.org/events/allofrochester/2004/

Contact

Links

http://www.littap.org/resources/4.4.4.TipsforBookDiscussion.pdf

https://www.wallacefoundation.org/knowledge-center/pages/increasing-cultural-paticipation-handbook.aspx

This step-by-step handbook, a product of Wallace’s Audiences for Literature Network initiatives, helps arts presenters find new audiences and develop relationships with them. Charting the process from goal-setting through evaluation, this guide sheds light on the nuts and bolts of research, scheduling, budgeting, organization, marketing and documentation. It includes checklists, surveys and worksheets that can be used by a wide range of arts providers and others interested in building participation. Please visit the Wallace Foundation site to learn more and download the handbook.