New York State Literary Technical Assistance Program

CATEGORY: Writers on Teaching

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Frank Perez is a playwright and director for theater and film. He has worked with various arts-in-education programs throughout the city. He directed “The Livingroom” by poet and playwright Reverendo Pedro Pietri, which was produced at the Nuyorican Poets Cafe in 1999. His published writing includes biographies of the actor Raul Julia and union activist Dolores Huerta (both from Rain Tree Steck Vaugn Pulishers, 1995), articles in Jump Cut Magazine, Latin New York Magazine, and Latino Film/Video Collaborative News, and a number of original plays.

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http://www.littap.org/resources/FrankPerez.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Quincy Troupe, poet, performer, memoirist, is the author of numerous volumes of poetry, including Weather Reports, Avalanche, Choruses, and the children’s book Take It to the Hoop, Magic Johnson. With Miles Davis he co-authored Miles: The Autobiography, and subsequently wrote about his friendship with Davis in Miles and Me, which is now being made into a feature film. His latest book of poetry is Transcircularities, from Coffee House Press. Following are excerpts from a talk given by Quincy Troupe at Teachers & Writers Collaborative on October 3, 2002, to a group of teaching artists.

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http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.3.WOTQuincyTroupe.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Jenny Robinson has been teaching creative writing in New York City public schools through Teachers & Writers Collaborative for three years and has also taught creative writing in the schools in Seattle, Washington. She studied fiction at Sarah Lawrence College. She currently lives in Brooklyn, New York where she continues to work on her own writing. Following is the second in a series of fiction writing lessons Jenny Robinson taught to a group of elementary school students in Brooklyn, New York. In the first lesson (which was a Halloween lesson that we will save for the appropriate season), she and her class talked about what fiction is–made-up stories–and talked about similes and metaphors, and wrote in the voices of make-believe characters. …

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http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.2.WOTJennyRobinson.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Jenny Browne is a Texas poet (against the death penalty and George W. Bush!) She lives in San Antonio and is regional director of Borderlands, Texas Poetry Review. Her poems are included in the Poetry Society of America’s Poetry in Motion Project in Austin, Texas and upcoming in permafrost, Many Mountains Moving and 5AM. She has taught throughout the state for the Texas Commission on the Arts, Arts San Antonio and Gemini Ink. Her first collection of poems, Glass, was published by Pecan Grove Press. “I have been sitting on the floor with a class of first-graders for nearly an hour when a girl waves both hands wildly above her head. ‘Miss, ‘she exclaims, ‘I am so thirsty with talk.’ We are working our way towards metaphors, but her inspired declaration reminds me once again that these students don’t really need me to ‘teach’ them poetry. They just need some water.” …

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http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.8.WOTJennyBrowne.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Daniel Kane interviews Jordan Davis on his experience running an IRC Chat in Doris Parker’s 6th grade class at the Ralph Bunche School and a First Class chat in Marianne Melendez’s 6th grade class at School for the Physical City. Both schools are located in Manhattan.

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http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.9.WOTJordanDavis.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Poet Kenneth Koch shows how to incorporate Frederico Garc?a Lorca’s poem “Arbol?, Arbol?” (Tree, Tree) into a bilingual classroom. This exercise is adapted from Koch’s essay on teaching Lorca, which you can find in the T&W book Luna Luna, edited by Julio Marz?n.

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http://www.littap.org/resources/WOTKennethKoch.pdf
http://www.littap.org/resources/WOTKennethKoch.doc

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Lee Ann Brown was born in Tokyo and raised in Charlotte, North Carolina, and graduated from Brown University in 1987. She is currently on the faculty of the Naropa Institute’s Writing and Poetics Program in Boulder, Colorado. She also runs writing residencies through T&W and is the founder and editor of Tender Buttons Press. Lee Ann’s most recent book is Polyverse, available from Sun & Moon Press. Other publications include The Voluptuary Lion Poems of Spring (Tender Buttons press, 1997). The following piece on Personal Dictionaries was excerpted from an article featured in the May – June 1999 issue of Teachers & Writer’s magazine. To read some of Lee Ann’s poetry, go to the following web sites: http://www.jacketmagazine.com:80/16/br-brow.html, http://bostonreview.mit.edu/BR23.5/Equi.html or http://www.sunmoon.com/lit_lives/brown.html.

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http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.7.WOTLeeAnnBrown.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Kristin Prevallet is the author of Perturbation, My Sister (a study of Max Ernst’s Hundred Headless Woman) which was published by First Intensity Press. Her most recent chapbook is Selections from The Parasite Poems, published by Barque Press. Some of The Parasite Poems can be seen in the Poets & Poems section of the Poetry Project web site. She has edited a selection of ballads and collages by the poet Helen Adam. She is the co-editor, with Tonya Foster, of Third Mind: Creative Writing through Visual Art, from Teachers & Writers Collaborative Press.

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http://www.littap.org/resources/WOTKristenPrevalet.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Nicole Hefner has had her poems published in The New York Quarterly, Lingo, Washington Square Review, The Windmill, The Young Zionist Newsletter, and EarthQuakes. Ms. Hefner was awarded the Washington Square Poetry Prize in 1998. Jean Valentine was the judge. A graduate from the University of Oklahoma, where she studied under legendary poet George Economou, Nicole went on to study under Sharon Olds, Marie Howe, and Jean Valentine in the MFA program at New York University. She now lives in Brooklyn with her fish and two men. Nicole likes to horseback ride, kayak, and rapel down sheer cliffs without safety ropes.

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http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.7.WOTNicoleHefner.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Aaron Belz is a poet, non-fiction writer, and critic who has published in magazines ranging from Gulf Coast to Wired. He also writes extensively on digital media and was a founding partner of Schwa.com. He has spent this spring teaching at Jackson Elementary School in the city of St. Louis, where he lives with his wife and two kids. Aaron has an MA in Creative Writing from NYU (1993). Today we did the lesson that my third-grade kids had been talking about from the time they first perused their books: “Braggin’ Rites.” Next week is my last week with them, so I had to choose one of the remaining lessons, and this was the one that cried out to be tried.

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http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.6.WOTAaronBelz.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. The work of Daniel Paley Ellison, photographer and poet, tells idiosyncratic stories of suffering and the end of suffering. His work has been published and shown internationally. Thirty of Daniel?s photographs were featured in the non-fiction book, Majic Bus, Harcourt Brace, 1993. Daniel has lectured on his photography and writing at universities, bookstores, and on National Public Radio and Good Morning America. Daniel has collaborated with the Danish composer Hella Bredsdorff and with the Venezuelan choreographer Marlon Barrios Solano, creating dance pieces and concerts in New York City and in Spain. One of his current projects is The Seamless Monument, a collection of photographs and long poems from Auschwitz-Birkenau, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, and Israel/Palestine.

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http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.8.WOTDanielGraceEllison.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Kent Alexander has worked for eight years as an artist-in-residence throughout New York City public schools and hospitals for Teachers & Writers Collaborative and, more recently, The Open Classroom Collaborative. He also conducts writing and creativity workshops nationally. He is the author of numerous plays that have been produced here in New York, as well as across the U.S. He is currently shopping his first novel and at work on his second screenplay. “I know that playwriting can seem daunting when approaching it for the first time. Many students (and teachers, as well) find adjusting to the demands of the form is just too difficult to tackle and decide very early on that they hate plays. This is a shame because playwriting lends itself readily to students who desire to tell their stories through dialog and action. Students, through writing short plays, can learn that dialog is a wonderful window into language and is something they can easily shape with practice. By giving student writers a clear and simple format that can be instantly assimilated, teachers can not only build student confidence in writing, but can also insure that their students enjoy immense success understanding the components of fiction, as well.”

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http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.5.WOTKentAlexander.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Julie Carr teaches in the New York City Public Schools for Teachers and Writers Collaborative and for The Children’s Movement for Creative Expression. She also teaches improvisational dance in festivals and schools nationally. Her poetry has appeared in “Pequod”, “Salamander”, “The Greensboro Review”, and elsewhere, and is forthcoming in “Poet Lore”. She is the 1998 co-winner of “The Grolier Poetry Prize”. To reach Julie in order to ask her questions about teaching Shelley, you can e-mail her at george_lewes@email.msn.com.

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http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.8.WOTJulieCarr.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Will Alexander is a poet, novelist, essayist, and educator who lives in Los Angeles. He has three works forthcoming: a trilogy of novels, Sunrise and Armageddon, from Spuyten Duyvil; a novella, Alien Weaving, from Green Integer; and a book of poems, Sri Lankan Loxodrome, from Canopic Press. Following are excerpts of an aleatory talk given by Will Alexander at Teachers & Writers Collaborative on Thursday, October 3, 2002, to a group of teaching artists. Throughout his talk, Mr. Alexander was accompanied on guitar by Alan Smerdjian.

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http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.4.WOTWillAlexander.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. David Hollander, a writer and musician residing in Brooklyn, received his MFA from Sarah Lawrence College in 1997. His fiction has appeared in The Black Warrior Review and the Alaska Quarterly, and his non-fiction has appeared in The New Journal of Greek Philosophy. He is the winner of the Barbara Schoen Prize for excellence in fiction writing, and was a two-time finalist for the Henfield-Transatlantic Review Prize. He currently teaches writing at Purchase College, and in the Public Schools through Teachers & Writers Collaborative. Hollander is the author of the novel L.I.E., published by Villard Books, and thinks often about becoming a New York City fireman.

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http://www.littap.org/resources/WOTDavidHollander.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Corie Herman earned her M.F.A. from New York University and is a T&W writer-in-residence. A finalist for the 2002 Randall Jarrell Poetry Prize, her poetry has appeared in Kalliope, Caylx, and Phoebe. Her first collection of poems, Radishes Into Roses, was published by Linear Arts Press. “I have found, as a teaching-artist serving District 75 schools in New York City, that introducing short poetic forms to students with special needs has many benefits. For many emerging readers and writers and students with autism, poetic structure offers definable freedom, obtainable goals, and the opportunity to use other learning strengths, such as math. The quintet, popularly known as the cinquain, is an American poetry form developed by Adelaide Crapsey (1878-1914). The form was influenced by the Japanese tanka and haiku, and consists of five lines with twenty-two syllables (distributed as 2, 4, 6, 8, 2). Here is a typical class that integrates interpersonal skills, reading, writing, vocabulary, musicality, and movement.”

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http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.1.WOTCorieHerman.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. Tina Cane was born in Hell’s Kitchen and raised in NYC’s East and West Village. She attended the University of Vermont and the Sorbonne. She did her graduate work at the University of Paris X-Nanterre where she earned a Master’s in French literature. She has taught French, English and Creative Writing at Friends Seminary School in Manhattan and is presently on leave to write. Her poems have appeared in New Press Literary Quarterly, Salt Hill Journal, GIRLS: An Anthology (Global City Press, 1997) and Hanging Loose (#69, 70,and 75).

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http://www.littap.org/resources/4.6.7.WOTTinaCane.pdf

Professional writers and educators share their techniques for teaching imaginative writing and review books on writing pedagogy and related subjects. Please visit the Teachers & Writers website to learn more and to view this month’s current lesson plan and featured writer. The following text was adapted from the book How To Make Poetry Comics by Dave Morice. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 1994. Copyright 1983 by Dave Morice.

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http://www.littap.org/resources/WOTDaveMorice.pdf